(11) My Irish Castle at Sunrise #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always). Today, the challenge is to write a poem in which you closely describe an object or place, and then end with a much more abstract line that doesn’t seemingly have anything to do with that object or place, but which, of course, really does. I think of the “surprise” ending to this James Wright Poem as a model for the effect I’m hoping you’ll achieve. An abstract, philosophical kind of statement closing out a poem that is otherwise intensely focused on physical, sensory details. Happy writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net 

Continue reading

Advertisements

(9) What’s that?!? #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always). Today, write a poem that includes a line that you’re afraid to write. This might be because it expresses something very personal that makes you uncomfortable – either because of its content (“I always hated grandma”), or because it seems too emotional or ugly or strange (“I love you so much I would eat a cockroach for you”). Or even because it sounds too boring or expected (“You know what? I like cooking noodles and going to bed at 7 p.m.”). But it should be something that you’re genuinely a little scared to say. Happy (or if not happy, brave) writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net

Continue reading

(19) Romance a Dinner for Two #NAPOWRIMO

Many years ago, “didactic” poetry was very common – in other words, poetry that explicitly sought to instruct the reader in some kind of skill or knowledge, whether moral, philosophical, or practical. 

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always). Today, the challenge is to write the latter kind of “how to” poem – a didactic poem that focuses on a practical skill. Hopefully, you’ll be able to weave the concrete details of the action into a compelling verse. Also, your “practical” skill could be somewhat mythological, imaginary, or funny, like “How to Capture a Mermaid” or “How to Get Your Teenager to Take Out the Garbage When He Is Supposed To.” Happy writing!

Continue reading

(8) Alberta’s Little Flower #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT ISOur prompt (optional, as always). Poets have been writing about flowers since the dawn of time. Today, the challenge is to add your own poem to this long tradition, by finding a flower, and versifying in its honor. Happy writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net 

Continue reading

(18) “Listen to Your Mother” #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always). Today, the challenge is to write a poem that incorporates “the sound of home.” Think back to your childhood, and the figures of speech and particular ways of talking that the people around you used, and which you may not hear anymore. My grandfather and mother, in particular, used several phrases I’ve rarely heard any others say, and I also absorbed certain ways of talking living in Charleston, South Carolina that I don’t hear on a daily basis in Washington, DC. Coax your ear and your voice backwards, and write a poem that speaks the language of home, and not the language of adulthood, office, or work. Happy writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net 

Continue reading

(14) Breaking Heart Serenade #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always) comes to us from TJ Kearney. His challenge: to write a seven-line poem called a san san, which means “three three” in Chinese (It’s also a term of art in the game Go). The san san has some things in common with the tritina, including repetition and rhyme. In particular, the san san repeats, three times, each of three terms or images. The seven lines rhyme in the pattern abcabdcd. Happy writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net 

Continue reading

(15) Out All Night #NAPOWRIMO

AND THE ASSIGNMENT IS: Our prompt (optional, as always). Today, the challenge is to write a poem that incorporates the idea of doubles, because today marks the halfway point in our 30-day sprint. You could incorporate doubling into the form, for example, by writing a poem in couplets. Or you could make doubles the theme of the poem, by writing, for example, about mirrors or twins, or simply things that come in pairs. Or you could double your doublings by incorporating things-that-come-in-twos into both your subject and form. Happy writing! — taken from www.napowrimo.net 

Continue reading